Featured Expert Contributor, White Collar Crime & Corporate Compliance

Gregory A. Brower, a Shareholder with Brownstein Hyatt Farber Schreck, LLP in Las Vegas, NV and Washington, DC, with William E. Moschella, a Shareholder in the firm’s Washington, DC office.

Back in November 2017, then Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued a memorandum entitled “Prohibition on Improper Guidance Documents.”  This Sessions Memo included guidance concerning DOJ’s issuance of guidance that has not gone through the formal rulemaking process.  The Sessions Memo essentially provided that DOJ components may not use guidance documents to create legally binding requirements.  The point was to prohibit agencies from, in effect, creating de facto regulations outside of the formal rulemaking process.

Subsequently, in January 2018, then Associate Attorney General Rachel Brand issued a memorandum acknowledging the Sessions Memo as a “Guidance Policy,” and more specifically directing that Department litigators follow this Guidance Policy in determining the legal relevance of both DOJ and other agencies’ guidance documents in affirmative civil enforcement matters.